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The next few pages are examples of Double Seam defects seen visually or felt by hand. Good judgement and experience with Double Seams will save a lot of time if defects are spotted immediately.  Visual inspection of Double Seams should be made frequently and on a scheduled basis. Cross section and Tear down of the Double Seam for component inspection follow this section of Visual Defects.

Wooling

Wooling
Wooling or sometimes called 'Slivering' is a condition that is more predominant with aluminum beverage...

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Vee

Vee
A Vee, or sometimes called a Lip or Spur, is similar to a Droop only...

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Sharp Seam

Sharp Seam
This is a condition where the seam has a sharp edge around the top inside...

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Mushroomed Flange

Mushroomed Flange
A Mushroomed Flange is a can flange that is over formed, resulting in a long...

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Mismatch

Mismatch
A Mismatch or Mis-Assembly is the result of the can and cover never getting settled...

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Knocked Down Flange

Knocked Down Flange
A condition similar to a False Seam. Probable Cause Suggested Remedy Can flange damaged in...

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Jumped Seam

Jumped Seam
A Looseness in the seam approximately ½ inch from the soldered lap or cross over....

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False Seam

False Seam
This is a condition where the cover and body are not hooked together but each...

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Droop

Droop
A Droop is a small portion of the seam that extends below the bottom edge...

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Dead Head or Skidder

Dead Head or Skidder
A condition where the 2nd operation seam is not finished all the way around the...

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Damaged Cover Curl

Damaged Cover Curl
A Damaged Cover Curl is a condition where the curled portion of the cover gets...

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Creasing

Creasing
Creasing or sometimes called Scoring, is predominantly related to aluminum necked in beverage cans with...

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Body Buckling

Body Buckling
Body Buckling can occur anywhere up and down the can body depending on tin plate...

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