skip to Main Content

Cross Section Double Seam Defects are found after cutting a section of the Double Seam in, normally, three separate areas around the perifery of the seamed can.  The Cross Section is then viewed through a Seam Projector, Scope or Computerized Monitor. The Cross Section is magnified to better depict any possible defects.  The following pages are examples of Double Seam Defects that are easily seen using this method.

Sprung Seam

Sprung Seam
Sprung Seams have developed as a result of the welded side seams on can bodies...

Read more…

Short Seam Width

Short Seam Width
A Short Seam Width will be noticeably loose between layers of the metal when viewed...

Read more…

Short Cover Hook

Short Cover Hook
Probable Cause Suggested Remedy Loose 1st Operation Seaming Roll setting. Make adjustments. See Parts List...

Read more…

Short Body Hook

Short Body Hook
A condition where too little material has been provided to form the seamed can body...

Read more…

Seam Bumps

Seam Bumps
Seam Bumps are created from uneven distribution of lining compound and occur in seams from...

Read more…

Long Seam Width

Long Seam Width
Excessive pressure in the 2nd operation does not produce a good seam and may stretch...

Read more…

Long Cover Hook

Long Cover Hook
Probable Cause Suggested Remedy 1st Operation Seaming Roll too tight Make adjustments. See Parts List...

Read more…

Long Body Hook

Long Body Hook
A condition where too much material has been used to form the seamed can body...

Read more…

Hairpins

Hairpins
Hairpins are sometimes called R's or R-ing. A cross section cut away of the seam...

Read more…

Compound Squeezing

Compound Squeezing
Unlike Seam Bumps, Compound Squeezing is a condition where lining compound is forced out through...

Read more…

Body Wall Fracture

Body Wall Fracture
This defect can be seen through a Seam Scope. The body wall will be cracked...

Read more…

Back To Top